Category: Private Placements

SEC allows general solicitation and advertising in Rule 506 offerings @ Paper this Deal

Yesterday, July 10th, under the provisions of the JOBS Act the SEC passed its Final Rules which amended Rule 506 and Rule 144A to lift the ban on general solicitation and advertising in offering and selling securities in a Rule 506 sale as long as all purchasers of the securities are accredited investors.

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To Register or Not to Register?: Broker-Dealers and Finders @ Paper this Deal

If you are involved in a startup you undoubtedly have heard about the company’s need to raise money. If you’ve gone the regular route you may be funded by institutional investors, like an angel or VC fund. The company may also have raised money through a private placement by selling equity to investors directly or through brokers.

You may have heard of another type of person involved in the capital raising process called a “finder”.   Everyone has heard of the term a “finder’s fee” which is known to be about 10% of the overall transaction.   The concept is the same with startup financing or M&A activities, although who can qualify as a finder and how they can be compensated has been a big deal with the SEC in the last couple years.  The real issue is when anyone can act as a finder, and if they really should be registered with the SEC as a broker-dealer.

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SEC proposed regulations would allow general solicitation and advertising in a Rule 506 financing @ Paper this Deal

Last week the SEC issued its proposed regulations to allow for public advertising and general solicitation in Rule 506 offerings.

As way of background, at this point when companies are trying to raise funds in a private offering, they typically rely on Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933, which allows for an unlimited amount of funds to be raised and minimal disclosure requirements if the securities are sold to accredited investors.  Offering undertaken pursuant to Rule 506 also preempt state securities laws, except those relating to fraud and notice filing (and notice filing fee) requirements.  While all of the above makes Rule 506 the “go to” securities law exemption, the main reason it was originally allowed is because it has historically only been able to be used in private offerings, where the issuer (or the broker acting for the issuer) had a pre-existing relationship with the investor.

The JOBS Act, which I’ve discussed, contained a provision which would require the SEC to promulgate regulations to allow general solicitation and advertising in Rule 506 offerings, provided that all purchasers in such offering are accredited investors.

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Crowdfunding – Prepare your Company to Crowdfund @ Paper this Deal

As I’ve discussed earlier, the SEC is now preparing regulations to allow for Crowdfunding pursuant to the recently passed JOBS Act.  These should be done by 2013 (emphasis on should be done by then – we’ll see when they actually come out).  As you may have heard, it will allow for true equity sales over the World Wide Web.  Companies will soon be able to sell shares of their corporation (or LLC) through online portals to regular persons that are not accredited investors (i.e. not millionaires or otherwise sophisticated).

There are a couple of things to discuss, the first is whether this is something your company actually would want to do.  The second item is, if it is something you want to do, then what can you do to prepare your company to do a Crowdfunding raise in 2013 (or whenever the SEC finishes the regulations).

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How do I Value my Company?: Startup Valuation @ Paper this Deal

One of the most important issues when raising money from investors is the valuation of the company. This will drive all of the other financial terms of the deal: how many shares will be sold, at what price per share, and how much equity the investor will own in the company after the transaction.

In essence, for early stage (pre-revenue) startups, the company’s valuation is whatever the market deems it to be.  I’m not being glib, that’s actually how it works.  For example, say that I have a flat screen TV that I want to sell, if someone offers me $800, and then someone else offers me $900.  I’m selling it for the $900 and that’s the TV’s market value.  If an investor values you at $1M, then that’s your market value.  Now he could be undervaluing you, but probably not by a large amount, and if the investment goes forward at that valuation then it’s the de facto market price.  Now that doesn’t mean that there is no room to negotiate.  That’s why it’s always said that early stage company valuation is an art and not a science.

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The basics of Startup Funding @ Paper this Deal

So you’ve got a great business idea, and a team ready to bring it to market (or at least a plan to begin getting it there), but the one thing you don’t have, like a lot of new companies is the capital to begin.  This post will walk through the traditional process for a startup to seek and receive funding.

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JOBS Act Breakdown – What the New Crowdfunding Law Actually Means for Startups @ Paper this Deal

This is a follow up to my last post regarding the concept of crowdfunding in general and the progress of the JOBS Act through Congress (full name – Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act).   Since then, the Senate revised and passed the JOBS Act in a 73 to 26 vote.  The House then, voting on the amendments made by the Senate, passed it by a vote of 380 to 41.  This is something that both parties agree on, and were eager to work together to implement.  Josh Earnest, the White House Deputy Press Secretary, stated that President Obama will sign the JOBS Act into law this Thursday, with a bipartisan public announcement.  The President and Eric Cantor, one of the champions of the JOBS Act, will appear together for the signing of the bill into law.

This post will detail the provisions of the JOBS Act and how they will affect companies going forward.  The JOBS Act can be found here if you’d like to take a read.  After it is signed into law, the SEC has 270 days to promulgate regulations.  Expect the SEC to claim that they need more time, as the JOBS Act is a monumental change, and there are various consumer (i.e. the new investor) protections required, especially to prevent fraud which, unfortunately, could run rampant if left unchecked.  Hopefully Congress can put enough pressure on the SEC to get the regulations complete in the actual 270 day time period, and the regulations will actually have some teeth with respect to fraud without stifling startup’s ability to raise money.

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Startup Financing – Private Placements 101

Startups need cash, no doubt about it.  One of the ways to go about getting it is through a private placement.  This post will give an overview of how such a placement works.

For the sale of any stock in a startup corporation, the federal and state securities regulations require registration of such securities prior to the sale, unless there is an exemption from registration that is available to the company.  One of the exemptions from the registration requirements is when the securities are sold in a private placement.  This is a federal exemption which preempts state regulation, save for certain notification filings and fees to be paid wherever to whatever state the company and investors are located in.

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